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Thread: fuel regulator question

  1. #1
    Registered User label_sk8r's Avatar
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    fuel regulator question

    hey
    i've got an 86 blazer which means i have the high pressure electric fuel pump in the tank. But the engine i'm putting in has a mechanical pump on it. I've been told i have to put in a fuel regulator to keep the pressure in the right range. So what do i do do i remove the old mechanical pump and put in the regulator, or do i say screw the regulator and keep the mechanical pump, just dont hook up the wires for the electric one. I have a friend who did this on a s10 and said he just left the electrtic pump unhooked, the mechanical pump sucked the gas thrw the pump anyway.
    commoents suggestoins?

    thanks alot

  2. #2
    Slow Ride
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    use the mechanical and disconnect the electric.

  3. #3
    Senior Member tboz65's Avatar
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    you can do that......but keep in mind that the stock pump in the tank is not meant to stay stationary....so your mechanical is going to be working extra hard.....

    Personally I would buy a good regulator, and use the in tank pump..........guaranteed good fuel pressure, and you have a return line already at your disposal.......
    America, Love it, or get the hell out!

  4. #4
    Let's Go Pens! S/T Lover's Avatar
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    When I go V8, thats what I'm planning on doing (going witha good fuel pressure regulator to run between 5 and 7 psi) unless someone that knows more than me tells me something else...
    LT1/4L60E/Shaved handles, emblems, antenna/5-4 Drop/16" Xtreme Wheels.


    In 1095, Pope Urban II commanded the beginning of the most heinous period ever documented: The Crusades. While killing over 100,000 Turks in 1098, the Christians "did no other harm to the women found in [the enemy's] tents - save that they ran their lances through their bellies," according to Christian chronicler Fulcher of Chartres.

  5. #5
    16 Valves V8Isuzu's Avatar
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    I was planning on using my electric in-tank pump when I do my conversion, but after I priced the regulator (not bad - $25 bucks or so from any speed rag - Holley 12-803) AND the required return restrictor (my cost was $45 from the dealer thru the garage I work at), I decided to use a new, $15 (my cost) mechanical fuel pump. Just my luck, the in-tank pump would crap out in the near future, then I'd be paying ~$250 (again, my cost) for a new Delco pump/sending unit assy. If a mech. pump goes out (which it usually doesn't w/o some decent warning), you can change it out on the side of the road if need be.

    Just my take on it. I do have a Holley blue that was given to me that I may use later. Again, that is an external pump, so easier to do work on if needed.
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  6. #6
    Let's Go Pens! S/T Lover's Avatar
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    what all do you have to do for a mechanical fuel pump??? just disconnect the relay on the electrical, hook up the mechanical to the fuel lines and thats about it ? (i know thats overly simplified)... isnt there anything more to it??? I thought the regulator was cheaper, easier, and more reliable than a new mechanical pump...
    LT1/4L60E/Shaved handles, emblems, antenna/5-4 Drop/16" Xtreme Wheels.


    In 1095, Pope Urban II commanded the beginning of the most heinous period ever documented: The Crusades. While killing over 100,000 Turks in 1098, the Christians "did no other harm to the women found in [the enemy's] tents - save that they ran their lances through their bellies," according to Christian chronicler Fulcher of Chartres.

  7. #7
    Freelance Gynecoligst V8S10BLAZER350's Avatar
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    When i first got my blazer together i installed a fuel pressure reg (holley) and use the stock electric pump . I ran in to a problem my motor makes 387hp at 4800 rpm's and the stock pump couldn't keep up with the motor it would fall on its face at about 5200 rpm's but if your installing a tame motor you wont have a problem , i had to weld a sump to my stock tank and i am running a holley blue pump it pumps enought to feed the motor all the way to 6100 rpms and feed the 175hp nitrous kit .. the only way to tell is run the electric pump and see what happens ..


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  8. #8
    Doesnt look like this supernova's Avatar
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    s/t thats really all there is to it and a mechanical pump is like 11 dollars or thats how much the one ijust put on my other car was, so i say it is alot cheaper than keeping your intank pump

  9. #9
    out dated technology NotLegal's Avatar
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    I would use the regulator, because under hard excelleration the mech. fuel pump might not be able to muster the fuel up so that could cause a lean condition resulting in KAAABOOOM!!!! Just my two cents though. Later
    I finally hit a hundred posts and I still dont feel satisfied...

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